Allez les bleus: 5 mobility facts about Paris

It can already be assumed that traffic will come to a standstill in Paris and the entire capital will be on its feet to celebrate its world champions. We look at the mobility situations around the Champs-Élysées and the Eiffel Tower.

Didier Deschamps has made it: The Basque has led the French national football team into the final of the World Cup in Russia after the final at the 2016 European Championship in his own country. If the 49-year-old soccer teacher wins the title, he rises to a select circle of those who became world champions as players and coaches. It can already be assumed that traffic will come to a standstill in Paris and the entire capital will be on its feet to celebrate its world champions. We look at the mobility situations around the Champs-Élysées and the Eiffel Tower.

 

1. 2030 driverless subways

The Grand Paris Express is a network of six driverless subway lines planned for 2030 in the greater Paris area. It will consist of the existing Métro lines 11 and 14 to be extended and four new lines 15, 16, 17 and 18 to be created. The planned network is also called supermétro automatique régional (regional fully automatic super-subway). It will have a length of 200 kilometres and 72 stations and will be built under the aegis of the Société du Grand Paris (SGP) and the Syndicat des transports d'Île-de-France (STIF). The construction of the Grand Paris Express will double the size of the Paris Métronet, already the second largest in Europe at 220 km, and thus overtake the London Underground.

 

2. Less traffic, but chilling on the Seine

Paris has closed a road along the banks of the Seine to traffic, giving it another pedestrian promenade in the heart of the city, reserved exclusively for pedestrians and cyclists. The decision to finally close the 3.3-kilometer Georges Pompidou highway was preceded by months of political disputes. The critics argued that there would be huge traffic jams in the center after the closure of the traffic axis with about 43,000 cars per day. Around 11,000 people signed a petition against the transformation of the quay, Mayor Anne Hidalgo - whose core theme is environmental protection - described the decision as an asset for mobility and an increase in quality of life.

 

3 Traffic of the future - now!

Paris has an attraction that most tourists overlook and that is mentioned in very few travel guides: In the French capital it is already possible to see what the traffic of the future could look like in many other cities. Between 1990 and 2015, the share of cars in city traffic fell by 45 percent, the share of trams, buses and trains increased by 30 percent over the same period and the share of cyclists increased tenfold. The city of Paris took measures early on to make life easier for pedestrians and cyclists: During his time as mayor, the later president Jacques Chirac (1977 to 1995) had bollards set up to prevent motorists from parking the pavements. Chirac's successor in office, Jean Tibéri, then presented the first programme for cyclists in 1996, new cycle paths were created and speed-30 zones were introduced. Since 2007, "Vélib" has been one of the largest bicycle rental systems in a western metropolis.

 

4. With the e-scooter through the city

The e-scooter startup Lime is currently conquering the French capital and supplementing the multimodal approach in the cityscape. The Lime scooters are solidly built, but relatively light, thanks to their light green engines easy to recognize and lively, with a top speed of about 24 km per hour. The booking simply runs via app on the smartphone, the scooter is started with the scan of a QR code directly on the driver.

 

5. Electric Carsharing Autolib failed

Like almost every metropolis, Paris has problems implementing new mobility concepts. A current example is the failure of the Autolib car sharing app. Around 4,000 of the small silver "Autolib" cars that billionaire Vincent Bolloré has brought to Paris since 2011 have turned the capital into one of the world's hopes for electric mobility. But the withdrawal of the concession has put an abrupt end to all this. Three reasons speak for the radical step: an explosion in costs, the poor service provided by the Autolib team to users and the lack of charging points within the city. For design reasons, the electrically powered Autolib vehicles must be immediately coupled to a charging station when they are stationary - almost impossible within Paris.